Primary school

by Peter Griffith

 

Emily Allbright works in a computer-shop. She is in love with the local doctor, Jasper Doublejoy. But all her plans go wrong when a valuable golden computer-mouse is stolen from the shop. The story takes us from the police-station to the airport, and from a British café to a Mallorcan beach. In the end, all are happy – apart from the villainous thief who caused all the trouble. And all have learnt that there are two sorts of mouse: the sort that squeaks and eats cheese, and the sort that you need to play computer-games.

 

This exciting and entertaining comedy-thriller is written in language suitable for pupils in the 3rd and 4th school-years, and presented very visually so that even those who cannot understand the words are able to follow the story. During the play, while looking for the thief, the children have the chance to practise words that they will have been learning in their lessons – the colours, the numbers, clothing, animals, drinks, opposite adjectives, words for simple actions, etc.

 

 

Photos of 'The Golden Mouse'

 

 

Extract from the script 'The Golden Mouse'

Truncher: What does the thief look like?
Emily: He is a horrible man. He is wearing a brown jacket and blue trousers and a grey cap and a yellow scarf.
Truncher: (writing) Horrible man. Brown jacket, blue trousers, grey cap, yellow scarf.
Emily: That's right.
Truncher: Right. Let's have a look. Horrible man. Brown jacket, blue trousers, grey cap, yellow scarf. (speaks to the children) Can you see a person with a brown jacket and blue trousers and a grey cap and a yellow scarf? Look, here's someone with blue trousers. (speaks to one of the children) You, stand up! Is this the thief?
Emily: No. This boy has blue trousers. But his jacket is red.

by Peter Griffith, based on a fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen

a dramatisation of Hans Christian Andersen's famous tale. The Ice Queen wants to freeze the world, and two children set off on a quest to try to stop her: but will they be strong enough to bring warmth to a frozen planet? This magical play is suitable for primary-school pupils with at least two years' experience of English.

Fotos von 'The Ice Queen'

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Textauszug aus 'The Ice Queen'

Queen: Kai... Kai...
Kai:

That’s funny. I think I can hear a voice. Someone is calling my name. Can you hear 

anything?

Queen:

Kai... Kai... 

Kai:

Who’s there?

Queen:

Kai... Come to me. 

Kai:

Someone is outside my window. Who is it? 

Queen:

Kai... Kai... 

Kai:

Hello – who is there?

Queen:

Kai, come here.

Kai:

Who are you?

Queen:

Hello Kai. Come here.

 

 

by Peter Griffith

 

Mr and Mrs Mouse have made a comfortable home in a clock. But problems begin when Mr Mouse eats too much cheese, and he is too fat to squeeze through the hole that leads to the outer world. This delightfully simple play is suitable for children of kindergarten age, and for pupils who are just beginning to learn English.


 

Photos of 'The Mice in the Clock'

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Extract from the script 'The Mice in the Clock'

Arthur: Yes, this is our bedroom. And this is the bed. I like to lie on our bed.
Isa: Yes, my husband likes to lie on the bed. Why don´t you do some work?This is the bedroom.
Arthur: Me? Work? Oh... tomorrow. 
Isa: What?
Arthur: Tomorrow I can work. Today I am tired. Today I lie on the bed. 
Isa: He is a lazy fat mouse.
Arthur: What is that?
Isa: Nothing, my dear
Arthur: Oh. 
Isa: Now Arthur, show us what is in the wardrobe.
Arthur: Me?
Isa: Yes, you.
Arthur: But I am resting - on the bed. 
Isa: Arthur, get up and show us the wardrobe. 
Arthur: Oh, all right. This is the wardrobe. And in the wardrobe... I keep my clothes. Here is my jacket.
Isa: His jacket - what colour is it?
Arthur: Green. 
Isa: Good - a green jacket. 
Arthur: And here are... what is this? 
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