by Guy Wilson, based on the novel by Oscar Wilde

 

The artist Basil Hallward has painted a portrait of a beautiful young man, Dorian Gray. When he sees the portrait, Dorian wishes that he could always remain as beautiful as he appears in the portrait – and that the picture, instead, should grow old and ugly.
The wish is granted! Dorian lives a wild life of excess and debauchery, stooping even to blackmail and murder – but he remains young and beautiful. Meanwhile, the picture shows all the corruption of his soul…

Oscar Wilde's fascinating novel is a modern version of the Faust legend, and a classic of late nineteenth-century literature, expressing the decadence and the aestheticism of the fin de siècle.

 

 

Photos of 'The Picture of Dorian Gray'

 

 

Extract from the script 'The Picture of Dorian Gray'

Henry: You are a wonderful creation. You have the most marvellous youth, and youth is the one thing worth having. Some day, when you are old and wrinkled and ugly you will feel it. The gods have been good to you. But what the gods give they quickly take away. Time is jealous of you. Don't squander the gold of your days. You are glad you have met me, Mr. Gray.
Dorian: Yes, but shall I always be glad?
Henry: 'Always' is a dreadful word. People are so fond of using it. Every romance is spoiled by trying to make it last forever.
Basil: The portrait is finished.
Dorian (looks at the portrait): How sad. I shall grow old, but this picture will always remain young. If only it were the other way and I could always be young while the picture grew old. For that - for that - I would give my soul.
Basil: Don't you like it?
Dorian: I am jealous of everything whose beauty does not die.