Intermediate

by Peter Griffith

 

Lena and Gavin are two 17-year-olds who meet on the beach in Brighton. She comes from a wealthy background – but he is penniless. She is German – and he is English.
On a trip to London they explore the sights of the big city...but what hope is there for their relationship?

 

 

Photos of 'Dreaming in English'

 

 

Extract from the script 'Dreaming in English'

Joe: Deckchairs. Deckchairs. Only two pounds. Deckchairs. Excuse me, miss. That will be two pounds please.
Lena: Sorry?
Joe: Your deckchair. Two pounds please.
Lena: I am sorry. I don’t understand.
Joe: Deck - chair - two - pounds.
Lena: I don’t understand.
Joe: Miss, you are sitting on a deck-chair. Deckchairs cost money. You must pay to sit on one of these deckchairs. You must give me money. Now. Please. Two pounds.
Lena: Money?
Joe: Yes, money.
Lena: But I have no money.
Joe: No money? Oh come on. They all say that. No money? Come on, give me two pounds.
Lena: I don’t understand.
Gavin: Excuse me, do you need help?
Lena: Thank you. I don’t know what this man is saying.
Gavin: Do you have a problem?
Joe: This girl is sitting on one of my deckchairs. She must pay two pounds.
Gavin: OK, this girl is a friend of mine. It’s not her deckchair. She’s looking after it for her grandmother. Her grandmother will pay.
Joe Grandmother?
Gavin: Look, her poor old grandmother is ninety-seven years old, and she can’t walk very well, and she has been using this beach since before you were born, so don’t you make such a fuss about a poor old lady...
Joe: All right, I give up. But if you ever use one of these deckchairs again, you will have to pay two pounds.
Gavin: Thank you. We understand.
Lena: Yes. (Deckchair-Joe exits)
Joe: Deckchairs. Two pounds a go. Deckchairs...
Lena: Thank you.
Gavin: That’s all right.
Lena: Thanks you for your help.
Gavin: No problem. Are you all right now?

by Peter Griffith

 

Barney is in Love with Zola, the new girl in his class: but he is too scared to speak to her. 

His friend Jake gives him a bottle of vodka "to get him in the mood". Will alcohol lead him to happiness with the girl of his dreams? 

 

'Drinking for Dummies' is a lively and entertaining comedy that gradually turns to tragedy...

 

Fotos of 'Drinking for Dummies'

 

Extract from the script 'Drinking for Dummies'

Tamsin: Zola - Barney - here you are! I´ve been looking everywhere for you. 
Zola: You have? 
Tamsin: I´ve had a great idea. You know, Jake and I are planning to go clubbing on Saturday - 
Barney: You are?
Tamsin: And we´d asked Barney to come along with us.
Zola: You did? 
Tamsin: And I just thought, why don´t we ask Zola along as well, and make it a little party - the four of us.
Zola: Well, I don´t know - 
Tamsin: Isn´t that a good idea? 
Barney: Yes. Good idea. 
Tamsin: Zola is new here, and so we can show her round. You can help show her round, can´t you Barney?
Barney: Er... Yes - yes, that´s right. 
Tamsin: What do you say Zola? Isn´t it a good idea? Come with us, and we´ll show you the town. 

by Peter Griffith

 

Sam is eating less and less, and taking lots of violent exercise. She quarrels with her boyfriend and shouts at her parents. What is her problem?

Food for Thought is a moving play about anorexia – a disease from which some five per cent of British schoolgirls suffer. Will Sam be one of the survivors? Will she find the strength to defeat the insidious illness? And how can her friends and family cope with the fact that Sam’s relationship with the disease is now the strongest relationship in her life?

 

 

Photos of 'Food for Thought'

 

 

Extract from the script 'Food for Thought'

Anorek: Your mother’s bringing you some milk. What are you going to do with that milk?
Sam: Drink it, I suppose.
Anorek: Milk is full of little globules of fat. If you drink it, the fat will spread through your body and puff out your skin. It will make you flabby. Is that what you want?
Sam: No.
Anorek: Then think: how can you avoid drinking the milk?
Sam: I…could spill it on the floor.
Anorek: No good – she’ll just bring you another glass.
Sam: I could…distract her attention, and then pour it away somewhere.
Anorek: Good, that’s better. Now think, how can you distract her attention? Think! You haven't got much time!
Sam: I could…I know, I could tell her that I’ve hurt my foot, and when she looks down I could pour the milk...into the bed.
Anorek: So that’s the plan. Look out, she’s coming.